When to use Video Analysis

You can use video analysis for competitions to view certain actions, comment on them and give your vision as a trainer/coach. Your players will understand better what you mean from the images. In addition, you can indicate exactly what is applicable with annotations with the drawing tools.

Video analysis: ‘a hype’ or a ‘must have’?

Movement analysis

If an athlete/student is wrong on the ice or if he is not sitting properly on the bike or if he has an abnormal swing, then an accurate measurement process is discussed based on entered criteria and marked ‘key-points’ on the basis of his/her/ her data and an ideal picture (for example, bike fitting for the correct position on the bicycle, gait analysis for shoe advice, angle measurement for golf, et cetera). Then it’s a motion analysis. This is much more extensive and specific than video feedback because many more indicators are involved. It goes without saying that this means and the associated outcomes can be used in the performance, curative and preventive field.

Feedback If the objective is to give the athlete/student a picture of his movement performance and to give him a technical instruction/tip based on this that must be practiced and reviewed afterwards, then we are talking about video feedback. The emphasis is specifically on the analysis of the current movement activity in relation to the ideal performance. In most cases this concerns an individual movement skill.

How can video analytics be used even more? Video analysis as a tactical tool When you record attack patterns of the other team, especially in team sports (but also in fencing, for example), you use video analysis as a tactical tool.

Quotes that prompted this article: “Movement skills are for the most part learned through visual information; seeing someone demonstrate something works better than having it (just) explained in words.” ((2005) Borghouts, L., Physical Education 10)

“Skating is a very technical sport where it is very common to spend a lot of time on the technical execution of a movement. Standard technique accents such as how to stand on the ice, the skating position, the take-off and the appearance are familiar accents to most skaters. However, structurally analyzing the skating movement on the basis of phases and ‘key poses’ is almost not done.” ((2008) TCT, Carol, M.).

“If one wants to achieve a performance improvement through a technique analysis, it is recommended to make an analysis of the performance-determining factors that are related to that technique. Starting from a movement description via a model implementation, possibly with an indication of the most common errors, is a good strategy.” (Ghent University: Dirk de Clercq and P. Malcolm 18/05/2009).

P R A C T I C E How sharp that eye is/becomes/remains is of course partly dependent on the necessity of its use, one’s own interests, the increase of the years and…. your hobby. The high jump trainer/LO colleague at the local athletics club will remain/become more adept at this subject than the PE teacher who is active at the swimming club, for example, and only teaches high jump for a limited number of lessons per year at school. in his own classes. The pleasure of movement, the lesser differentiation, the almost fixed score based on fixed criteria (‘Adaptive assessment’ (2011) Dokkum, G.J., Physical Education and one’s own physicality probably do not really force you to a razor-sharp analysis if the child is not explicitly asks for it himself. How different is the situation with the ambitious athlete who anticipates his person his own team or that you should adjust your own playing style (basketball, hockey,..). The coach analyzes the images and can in a ‘time out’ ‘ or pause, help the athlete or the team move forward or have meaningful and visible information available again after the game for follow-up training. For PE practice, this is an addition to the ‘freeze’ moment in a game situation. If the students actually freeze’ when the teacher calls it, it is often very enlightening, for example to show ‘clump football’ or a completely wrong defensive position. If you can make use of moving images and thereby provide insight into the cause and/or incorrect walking lines, this is of course a gain. And those ‘live’ images often say much more than just the spoken word.

Common Uses of Video Analytics The last application of video analysis is ‘just’ recording movement behavior in the broadest sense of the word and using that to give the student/pupil/class feedback about their game, self-teaching, refereeing, their posture, et cetera, and that is of course just fun, educational and literally illustrative. This does not concern the deployment of a tactical analytical concept, but purely and solely about the informative value.

The (LO) teaching practice With some examples I show how the video/motion analysis can be used in the lesson. The high jump class is very well known, in which the teacher assesses the jumps through a qualitative observation: looking at the movement. This commonly used and valuable observation method has been acquired through our own (sports) experience and training, resulting in a high degree of practice (‘the eye of the master’). How sharp that eye is/becomes/remains is of course partly dependent on the necessity of its use, one’s own interests, the increase of the years and…. your hobby. The high jump trainer/LO colleague at the local athletics association will remain/become more adept at this subject than the PE teacher who is active, for example, at the swimming club and only teaches a limited number of lessons per year at school in high jump. its own classes. The pleasure of movement, the lesser differentiation, the already almost fixed score based on fixed criteria (‘Adaptive assessment’ (2011) Dokkum, G.J., Physical Upbringing 6) and one’s own physicality probably do not really force you to a razor-sharp analysis if the child does not explicitly ask for it.

How different it is with the ambitious athlete who wants to improve his personal best at all costs or achieve a record in his last year within a certain age group. In addition to the general knowledge about approach, distance from the bar and foot placement, it is suddenly about very specific (partial) moments that can no longer be distinguished with the human eye; let alone reproduce or meaningfully analyze. The measurable variables such as distance, speed, body angles, external forces and the like, recorded via the video camera system, then form a very welcome source of objective reproducibility. Video analysis is sufficient to give the student a global picture of his/her jump. However, to achieve a truly measurable performance improvement, that material is only usable if the desired technique (say the Fosbury flop) is related to the performance drivers.

The so-called ‘stick model’ is then used for the movement analysis. The human body is divided into small segments (‘sticks’) that are related to each other with corresponding joint rotation possibilities. Those locations can/should be marked (‘key points’). The recordings are then compared with the biomechanical ideal picture and … the analyst (LO teacher/trainer-coach) with sufficient frame of reference and methodical knowledge in the relevant branch of sport, can help the athlete/student move forward with the next step, indication or correction.

This application can also be used to perfect your seat on the bicycle by means of the so-called ‘bike fitting’. This therefore involves recording and subsequently analyzing a movement pattern in which you want to measure and determine the causal factors in order to provide points for improvement on that basis.

A second possibility for using the motion analysis is of course to place an earlier and a later (distance/height) jump next to each other, whereby you can use the tools supplied in the program, by drawing lines and angles, to You can indicate whether the subsequent jump was performed better or less well than the previous one. You then compare the recorded images of the relevant student/pupil with each other and can indicate the visible progression. The visual material is therefore used as a technique analysis tool. Easy to edit and easily reproducible and easy for the student to pick up as a technical cue. To prevent the sensorimotor function from goes through fatigue, you can only do a limited number of jumps in a row. The need for video analytics

Just like the rise, presence and development of TV, duplicator, pick-up and the telephone, within less than 50 years, to the Ipad, scan, mail, fax, print device, Wii and mobile phone, camera applications have also become an achievement of this time. Whether you can and want to use them is, of course, simply an individual choice. A test is available to determine whether there are other arguments to demonstrate the necessity of using this or not. For his graduation (2011) Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences student Teun de Vree conducted research into the usefulness and value of video analysis for sports associations.